Archive for the ‘Reviews’ Category

Alien Isolation – Game Saga Review

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We recently had the opportunity to review Alien Isolation brought to you by Creative Assembly and Sega on the ps4 As I don’t really have a basis to judge this game against other than marines vs aliens which was outright terrible. Everyone at EB Games was telling me how great this game was so I gave it a try.

Graphics - 7/10 – Graphics are okay. I mean things looked okay but I kept  getting a weird Doom like flashback once in a while. Also I ended up having to check things around me over and over again just to see what they were.

Sound/Music - 7.5/10 – All I can remember is the footsteps that Alien makes when it’s chasing your ass down. Everything else was just ear candy compared to  that. Oh and the screams were well done.

Gameplay - 7.5/10 – So I have to admit that I didn’t actually play this game for too long. I spent a lot of time building things up and checking everywhere on the map. Then it got scary so I left and traded it in. Seriously.

Story – 8/10 – I am going to give it an eight because there was a great storyline about a missing ship. Lots of suspense and it looks like someone built up the plot nicely. Maybe I should have played longer

Challenge – 7 /10 – So this is where things start to fall apart. I like finding my way through maps and solving puzzles but there is a point when it becomes freaking annoying and doesn’t get past that. I mean how did the original crew of the station actually accomplish anything by having so much red tape just to open a door. Oh and I thought I was so sneaky finding a gun before the alien found me. But guess what… I couldn’t use it yet so useless.

Replay Value & Fun Factor – 7/10 – Between being scared and annoyed and armed with a gun I couldn’t use. I was out.  Game gone early. So probably will never replay and I guess fun if your into that kinda stuff.

Buy It Or Not? – Try the Demo, Buy If You Like It! – Ya, give it a try, if you like that style of game. Not for me

Available for xbox, xbox one, ps3, ps4, playstation, pc

Overall (Average) – 7.2/10

Source: GameSaga Original

 

So Many Me (PC) – GameSaga Review

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We recently had the opportunity to review So Many Me from Extend Interactive & Origo Games. It’s a cute, charming puzzle-platformer that will lure you in with thoughts of fun-filled adventures and then make you beg for mercy with its challenging puzzles. Want to know more? Read on for our full review.

Graphics - 7.5/10 – So Many Me may not blow you away with graphical prowess, but what is there is well done and is well-suited to the nature of the game. The game is meant to be a fun whimsical romp through the land of Xio and the art style definitely helps set the mood for this theme. Characters and enemies are easily distinguishable and your Me’s convey a lot of personality despite being little slime-like creatures. So Many Me feels like a children’s storybook or younger audience comic book come to life and if you’re just playing the game without trying to progress, the setting will surely put a smile on your face.

Sound/Music - 9/10 – Music in So Many Me is very well done. I came away quite impressed with it and like the graphics, it is also well-suited to the game’s theme. It’s very pleasing to listen to and would make good background noise to do just about anything while listening. I’m not sure if a soundtrack is available or not, but even without one, you can still just load up the game and sit there with it running and listening to the cheery tunes. Sound meanwhile is not as impressive in my opinion, though it is by no means bad, it’s just okay. I did like the “voices” of the Me’s though and thought that this added to their charm.

Gameplay - 8/10 – Games like this are designed to have gameplay be the bread and butter and this is certainly the case with So Many Me. The game is a puzzle-platformer as I mentioned above. As such, there are numerous puzzles throughout each level for you to solve. Some are optional, though there are others that required in order to complete a level. Optional ones generally lead you to areas where you can collect the various artifacts that are strewn about the levels. There are gold rings for example which you can exchange in one of the hub worlds of the game to a NPC who will give you various abilities in return. Some of the platforming segments in the game require nearly precision inputs and thus can be challenging if you’re not used to this type of game. Fortunately, the developers at Extend Interactive were kind enough to give players infinite lives so you can keep on trying. So Many Me also features transformations where you can change your Me’s into larger characters with different abilities. One of the first ones you gain access to is a dinosaur looking one who is heavier and thus can break through blocks by falling from great heights. He can also whip enemies and other blocks with his tail. Fortunately you can switch back and forth from this form to your group of Me’s whenever you want and some levels even require you to do this in order to progress. It’s a fun mechanic and one I enjoy in platforming games.

Story – 5/10 – The story in So Many Me doesn’t seem to be that apparent or obvious. Though being a puzzle-platformer, that is to be expected. The game even makes fun of the tropes of platformers where the hero is tasked with a quest to save the world and the NPC you meet seems frustrated that the Me’s didn’t let him finish explaining the game’s story/objective. I thought that was pretty fun and a nice touch for those of us who have played dozens of platformers before. Basically your objective is to guide Filo and your group of Me’s through their adventure in the land of Xio.

Challenge – 8/10 – Now challenge, that is another area where So Many Me truly shines. If you’re looking for a difficult game, you should check out So Many Me. It starts off simple enough and you’ll probably think, oh this isn’t so bad. Well just wait until you get to later levels. You’ll have to use enemies to bounce across dozens of spike covered platforms, quickly switch back and forth from block form to your Me form and still dodge enemies at the same time. As I mentioned above, certain sections of the game require the utmost precision and if you make even the slightest error, there’s no recovery from it and you will die. But like I said, you have infinite lives, so it’s not as bad as it could be in that regard.

Replay Value & Fun Factor – 7/10 – So Many Me features support for Steam Achievements and there’s 30 total to unlock in the game. There’s also tons of different costumes you can unlock as well to change the appearance of your Me’s. As I mentioned earlier, you also will be able to unlock different abilities to help you progress through the game, which is a trait not usually seen in games like this. If you can get past the challenging parts, there’s a lot of fun to be had in So Many Me. And you’ll want to keep trying just to see what is thrown at you next and to find more of your Me buddies.

Buy It Or Not? – Try The Demo, Buy If You Like It! – Games like So Many Me are not going to appeal to everyone as it is a difficult game in my opinion. As such, I would recommend you check out the free demo that is available on Steam to decide whether or not you’d be interested in it. Like I said, the game definitely is a fun experience if you can muster through the difficult areas and the music and graphics are quite pleasing and makes you just want to give the game a hug. Filo and the other Me’s are quite adorable and if their budget allows for it, I think Extend & Origo should market plush toys of them. That would be a neat thing for fans of the game and also advertise it as well.

Overall (Average) – 7.4/10

Overall (Non-Average) – 8/10 – I bumped up the score a little bit for So Many Me because overall I like the game. It just can be very difficult at times and this might make you want to throw your controller across the room, but if you persevere, there’s a lot to like in the game. Plus I really enjoyed the art style and the music for So Many Me as I mentioned above. So be sure to check it out on Steam. You can download a free demo and pick up the full version of the game for just $14.99.

Source: GameSaga Original

Image: Extend Interactive

Concursion (PC) – GameSaga Review

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We were recently given the opportunity to review Concursion, the retro style mash-up from Puuba Games & Mastertronic. As you may have seen on our Twitch channel the past few weeks, we’ve been finishing up the game and streaming footage. The game was tons of fun though it sure had its stressful moments. If you like old school games that will challenge you but still maintain a fun factor, you should check out Concursion. It’s available on Steam, for only $11.99. Want to know what we thought of the game in more detail? Read on for the full review.

Graphics – 7/10 – The graphics in Concursion are vivid, vibrant, and well suited to the game, but let’s be honest, this is not going to wow you with graphical prowess. Why? Because that is not what this game is about. It’s intended to be a retro-style game with 16-bit inspired graphics. Thus, graphics are mainly there to give the player something to look at and be able to distinguish themselves from enemies. That being said, some of the background art in the various stages is just gorgeous in my opinion. Very nicely done and would make nice wallpaper on a computer. Could the game look nicer? Yes, but it could also look a lot worse, and like I said, it’s not intended to be a gritty, realistic, art house type style.

Sound/Music – 7/10 – The music in Concursion is fairly catchy and nice to listen to as you to try to progress through the levels. It doesn’t oversaturate the levels, but provides a good background setting and allows you to concentrate on the gameplay, but still enjoy a nice relaxing theme. Same thing goes for the sound effects. Though I will admit, you will likely get sick of hearing the death sound effect as I know I did, as this is a tough game in spots and thus you’ll likely hear the death noise over and over again.

Gameplay – 9.5/10 – Now this is where Concursion truly shines. Puuba Games has developed quite an impressive amalgamation of genres. There’s platformer stages, Ninja Gaiden inspired stages, Pac-Man like stages, jet pack stages, and spaceship style stages resembling classics like the Gradius & R-Type series. And on top of all that, they even mix the different genres together within a single stage at times. Sometimes it’s two or three types, sometimes it’s all five. It really makes for an interesting gameplay mechanic and is something you don’t usually see a lot of in the industry. Most games stick with one or two genres, maybe three, but Concursion goes full-bore with five different ones in the same game, mixing them throughout like a fine cocktail of gaming goodness. And just when you think you’ve got things down and you’ve learned how the game will throw things at you, it’ll spin things around you and make you play the same exact kinds of stages in different ways. To conquer Concursion, you will truly have to master the different genres and be able to switch between them with only a few seconds of time to prepare.

Story – 6.5/10 – While the gameplay is phenomenal in Concursion, the story is somewhat bland and not too compelling in my opinion. That’s not to say it’s horrible or anything, it just is seemingly the same kind of thing we see in a lot of platformer type games. Though admittedly Concursion is more than just a platformer. But there is quite a big twist near the end of the game which reveals that the story is not all it seems to be and this twist is something that isn’t usually done in games like this, so that makes it a bit different from your average platformer type game. It’s a nice surprise, though it kind of makes you wish this had been revealed sooner and expanded upon further, as it would make it easier in my opinion to get into the game’s story and your objective.

Challenge – 9.5/10 – Wow…just wow. At first glance, you might think to yourself, how can a game like Concursion be difficult? Surely it’s just another cute platformer like so many games were back in the 1980s and 90s, right? Well, you’d be wrong, quite wrong. Why is that? Because this is much, much more than a mere platformer. As I mentioned above, there are a whole four other genres included within the game, puzzle, action, shoot-em-up, and adventure. So it’s not just a platformer. And let me tell you, this game will have you wanting to throw your controller at your monitor. It is that tough. Are there easy spots in the game? Yes, of course there are. But there’s plenty of hard sections as well that more than make up for this. There were certain levels I was stuck on for days and must’ve attempted 30 times or more before I was finally able to clear them. These types of stages require nearly 100% perfection on the controls and the gameplay mechanics in order for you to progress, so if you don’t have a solid grasp of these things, be prepared to struggle. Fortunately once you clear a stage like this, the game usually gives you a break and has several easier levels afterwards to help bring your frustration level back down to normal. And keep in mind, this has thus far said NOTHING about the collectible gem shards in the game. This is just to clear a level. To truly beat a level and accomplish everything, you have to collect around three to five gem shards in each stage. All while dodging the multitudes of enemies, avoiding falling the numerous pits, performing insane jumps, maneuvering through spiked corridors, and much, much more. While you’re flinging your controller towards your screen, you’ll likely rip out your hair as well. All I can say is, just take a break and come back to it in another day or two and maybe you’ll finally get past the super difficult parts. Concursion is definitely old school with its challenge, but fortunately, the game gives you infinite lives, so as long you reach checkpoints, you’ll rarely ever have to start a stage over completely.

Replay Value & Fun Factor8/10 – Concursion is a fun game overall, in my opinion. Is it tough? Yes, but it feels oh so rewarding when you finally clear a tough section of the game and even more so when you finally beat the game itself. That being said, this game will likely frustrate you, especially if you’re not used to retro style gaming. But even with the challenging portions, switching between different genres in the same game and even in the same level is an interesting mechanic and makes for a fun time. It’s somewhat similar to games like The Lost Vikings in that regard, though admittedly TLV didn’t switch genres on you, but rather had different abilities for the different characters. But you are required to switch between genres to progress in Concursion. If you do not, you will never complete the game. As far as replaying it goes, there are Steam achievements to unlock, gem shards to collect, and best time per stage leaderboards to conquer. Other than these things, there doesn’t seem to be much reason to play the game further once you have done all of this. I was unable to gather all of the gem shards in my play through and it’s possible that doing so may change the ending or unlock a hidden mode or feature, but that remains to be seen.

Buy It Or Not? – Buy! – If you like the idea of retro style gaming and are okay with games that will make you angry from how difficult they are, you’ll find a lot to like in Concursion. The game is difficult for sure, but not so much that you will play it thousands of times and never make it through. I mean, this isn’t Iron Tank after all. And even when you finish the game, you still can go through and collect gem shards you missed, unlock Steam achievements, and try to reach the top of the leaderboards for each stage with the fastest completion time. Concursion is only $14.99 on Steam, so there is a lot of game here for just $15. It’s well worth the money if you like the idea of retro inspired gaming and want something that will challenge you and still be fun at the same time.

Overall (Average) – 7.92/10

Overall (Non-Average) – 8.5/10 – I bumped the score up a bit for Concursion because it is just a fun game overall. Is it perfect? No, but few games are. There is a lot to like here in Concursion. The challenge is insane in the game and the gameplay itself is brilliant and makes me hopeful that game will do well enough to warrant a sequel. I’d love to see more games that utilize this type of mechanic, changing gameplay styles on the fly in levels.

Source: GameSaga Original

Shovel Knight (Multi) – Reviews From Around The Web

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Source: All Games Beta

Mario Golf: World Tour (3DS) – GameSaga Review

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Mario Golf: World Tour is the latest entry in the Mario Golf series, which sees characters from the Mario series of games take a break from adventures in the Mushroom Kingdom and pick up some clubs and hit the links for some golf action. But this being a Mario game, there’s of course some Mario themed hijinks thrown in. For the first time in the series, you can now use items before you take a swing. Items function somewhat similarly to how they do in the Mario Kart series. Mushrooms speed your ball up after it lands, Fire Flowers let you “burn” things (i.e. you can pass through the leaves of trees with no detriment to your drive distance), Bullet Bills rocket you ahead (this particular item makes your drive around 100 yards longer than it normally would be), etc. Of course you don’t get unlimited items because that wouldn’t make for much challenge. Items are limited and one time use only unless you happen to collect multiples of them. The items themselves appear on the ground or in the air of each hole usually in sets of 2-4 item boxes and you have to hit your ball through the item box to pick up the item. Power shots return as well, and like previous entries in the series, these too are limited with a set number per course (shared among all holes of that course).

Mario Golf: World Tour features Castle Club Courses and Mario World Courses. There’s also a clubhouse which is connected to an overworld of sorts which serves as the hub for single player. You can talk to various NPCs to find out about the game, shop for new unlocked gear, switch out gear, and walk to the Castle Club Courses to play through those. The Club features are similar to previous handheld Mario Golf titles and add in some light RPG-type elements. It’s one of the more enjoyable aspects of the game to me. My only complaint about it is that I wish there were more of it. I think the courses should’ve been divided more evenly in number instead of favoring the Mario themed ones.

Mario Golf: World Tour is also the first game in the series to feature DLC and one of a handful of Nintendo published titles to support this feature. I did not purchase the DLC for the purposes of this review as I was more concerned with the main game overall. The DLC adds in additional characters and courses which gives you even more to do in the game.

All-in-all though, Mario Golf: World Tour is a pretty fun game if you like golf or more specifically the Mario Golf games at all. It’s best played in pick up and play type of sessions in my opinion. This is probably not a game you will be playing for 10 hours straight like an MMORPG or anything like that, but it’s not that type of game of course, but there’s still plenty of content to unlock. The game features several unlockable characters and courses. I didn’t particularly like the unlocking method in Mario Golf: World Tour. Why? Because in previous games like Toadstool Tour for example, you could unlock things through several different modes. In Mario Golf: World Tour it appears Camelot decided to make pretty much everything unlocked from within the Challenge Mode of the game. This would be fine if you there were more variety of challenges, but as there’s only 7 different types offered it limits the appeal of this method in my opinion. Then when you consider the fact that there are around 10 challenges per course with 5 courses to unlock and 4 characters to unlock through Challenge Mode only you can see why it might become tedious. You don’t unlock them by completing certain challenges. Instead you unlock them by collecting Star Coins, which you get from completing challenges. It might seem like a minor thing, but it seems like it makes unlocking things much more time consuming than it was in previous games. There’s also unlockable gear, difficulties, Star versions of characters, and more. So there’s plenty to do, it just gets kind of repetitive after a while in my opinion. Don’t get me wrong, the main game is fun, but the Challenge Mode leaves something to be desired. I’d rather have characters unlocked through 9 or 18 holes of Match Play against said character for example. That would be more fun to me. As far as the breakdown about different aspects of the game, read on to find out what I thought about all of that after the jump.

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Murdered: Soul Suspect (Multi) – Reviews From Around The Web

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Source: All Games Beta

RainBlood Chronicles: Mirage Review

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Badass music, ninjas, beautiful cel-shaded/comic style graphics, a Chinese setting, what’s not to like about a game like RainBlood Chronicles: Mirage? We recently were given the opportunity to review this game and wow, this is just an all around great effort from the team at S-Game, a Chinese independent developer. This is their third RainBlood game, but unlike the first two, Mirage is not an RPG, but rather a side-scrolling beat’em up/hack & slash/action game. If Final Fight was set entirely in China and you replaced gangs with ninjas and such, then you’d get something like RainBlood Chronicles: Mirage.

Graphics – As I mentioned above, RainBlood Chronicles: Mirage uses a style quite reminiscent of cel-shading which gives it an almost comic book like look. This visual style seems to suit the game quite well in my opinion. Both playable characters and individual enemies are easily seen for the most part, though sometimes the enemies can be hard to individually distinguish from one another when you’re fighting against large groups of them, but given that this a beat’em up type of game, that usually isn’t that important to do (the exception being the ranged enemies which will be a major pain in the neck if not dealt with). 9/10

Sound/Music – Wow, just wow. The title theme in RainBlood Chronicles: Mirage is one of the best title themes and pieces of game music I’ve heard in many years, simply phenomenal. If this track doesn’t get you pumped to kick some ninja butt, nothing will. This theme wouldn’t be out of place in an Asian themed Mega Man level even. The rest of the game’s sounds and music are also well done. As you would expect, they have a heavy Asian influence/theme going, but that is what you would want from a game set in China. RBCM features voice acting as well, but unfortunately (or not depending on your perspective), the voices are in what I assume is Chinese. I don’t speak Chinese, so I have no idea what they’re saying, but fortunately S-Team was kind enough to put in English subtitles. 9.5/10

Gameplay – Being an action/beat’em up/hack & slash game, RainBlood Chronicles: Mirage follows a pretty simple formula. Kill all the bad guys and find your way to the end of the level and kill a boss, pretty standard fair. But RBCM adds in special skills and abilities you can use to do different moves and attacks. The game features a “store” where you can use several types of in-game currency to unlock said moves and attacks. Some are button combos to perform more advanced attacks, while others are special abilities that will use your special move meter to attack all the enemies on the screen at once for example. I did sometimes find it difficult to perform special moves, but maybe that is because of user error and not the game’s fault. They’re not 100% required to advance in the game from what I could tell, except for a jumping move you’ll learn, but that one is easy to execute. 8/10

Story – The story in RBCM sees our heroes going after an evil organization who are up to no good and Soul & Shang seek justice against them. Pretty standard stuff in this type of game, but still cool nonetheless. The game features various dialog sequences with just the heroes, just enemies, and with the heroes and enemies together. There’s also various collectibles you can find which tell you more of the story as well as hidden rooms with more story scenes. 6/10

Challenge – RainBlood Chronicles: Mirage would certainly make a good arcade game in my opinion. Why? Because the game is quite challenging even on Medium/Normal difficulty (which is called Killer in-game). It’s not a matter of if you’ll die, but how often. This type of game would be a quarter muncher back in the day for sure. Fortunately however, the game does provide extra lives you can collect, but in my play time with the game, they are few and far between. You can buy extras from the in-game shop using the game’s currency, but they are quite expensive (as you would expect to prevent “cheating”). RBCM features checkpoints even if you do wind up with a game over, but usually you’ll be sent back quite a ways and have to repeat challenging parts. Fortunately, you have two playable characters, so you can swap in and out to navigate through the game, though there is a short cooldown on this ability so you can’t just spam it constantly. 8/10

Replay Value – RBCM is a Steam title and as such, it features achievements that you can unlock. The game also has a lot of collectibles hidden throughout the levels for you to find and purchase unlockables such as abilities, attacks, and things like reduced damage or increased drop rate of currency. There are tons of things to unlock, so it’s doubtful you’ll be able to unlock every single thing without playing through each level multiple times. Multiplayer is featured in RainBlood Chronicles: Mirage as well, though I was unable to test this aspect of the game for this review. 6/10

Fun Factor – RainBlood Chronicles: Mirage is definitely a fun game if you enjoy beat’em up games, which I do. As I mentioned earlier, it’s a lot like Final Fight in a Chinese setting. The game’s challenge can be somewhat off-putting, but it doesn’t make the game less fun to me. I’m sure it would be even more fun in two player mode as well. 8/10

Buy It Or Not? – RainBlood Chronicles: Mirage is only $10 on Steam, which a great price for a game like this. That’s the advantage of something like Steam. Back in the day, this game would’ve been $50-60 easily, possibly more, but with Steam it’s only $10. If you like beat’em ups, you’ll get a lot of enjoyment out of RBCM for just $10. Buy!

Misc Notes – RainBlood Chronicles: Mirage does have a few flaws which didn’t bother me that much, but still deserve mention. There are occasional typos or incorrect word choices in various places such as on the game’s main menu screen. Here you’ll find the words Setting and Credit used instead of Settings & Credits, which makes more sense. But given that this game was developed by a Chinese team and for many of them it’s likely that English is not their first language, I can forgive this sort of thing for the most part. I mean they know English a lot better than I know Chinese for example.

Overall (Average)7.79/10

Overall (Non-Average) – RainBlood Chronicles: Mirage is a fun, albeit challenging game. The music is just awesome and makes you want to kick some butt. The visuals are very nice as well. I rounded up to 8 and added an additional half a point because I like the game overall despite a few minor flaws. 8.5/10

Source: GameSaga Original

Image: Steam